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Chemistry

Bohr

Niels Henrik David Bohr was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on October 7, 1885. He was an important physicist who studied atomic structure and quantum physics. His father (Cristian Bohr) was a teacher and his mother was from a Jewish family. As a student, he participated in a promotion at the Copenhagen Academy of Sciences.
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Chemistry

Electrochemistry

Electrochemistry is an area of ​​chemistry that studies the reactions that produce electric current through reactions called oxidation and reduction. It also studies the reactions that occur through the supply of electric current, known as electrolysis. In these situations, electron exchanges occur between atoms and ions.
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Chemistry

What does the chemist do?

Chemistry is everywhere. Much of the technological advancement achieved by civilization has come about through curiosity and the effort to develop new techniques to separate and transform materials found in nature. The Chemistry professional is a person able to know, research and also turn these materials into products.
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Physics

Magnets and magnets

A magnet is defined as an object capable of causing a magnetic field around it and can be natural or artificial. A natural magnet is made of minerals with magnetic substances, such as magnetite, and an artificial magnet is made of a material without magnetic properties, but which can permanently or instantly acquire characteristics of a natural magnet.
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Physics

James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879)

At age sixteen, James began studying mathematics, natural philosophy, and logic at the University of Edinburgh. In 1850 he moved to Cambridge, joining Peterhouse College. Because it was easier to obtain a scholarship, he moved to Trinity College, which had been attended by Isaac Newton (1642 - 1727).
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Chemistry

Why is our world colorful?

Light is produced when electrons vibrate, rapidly moving back and forth between various levels of energy that exist in the electrosphere of an atom. For each jump, a photon is emitted, which is a monochromatic light of well-defined wavelength (color). This results in the emission spectra, formed by streaks or colored bands, which even serve to identify the light-emitting atom.
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